Background-Inside

 

Background-Inside

What We Don’t See.

 
Lusitano-025Some background-Inside your horse:The horse’s digestive system is approximately thirty meters long and starts at the mouth.   Most of those thirty meters are made up of intestines.   The horse’s lips are prehensile.   That means they move and are used to grab and yank grass from the ground.   They are also used to pick particles of grain and concentrated foods.   The mouth is armed with incisor teeth that cut the grass which is pushed back to the molars and premolars which grind it to a pulp.

Horses have relatively small stomachs which is why they are eating all the time.   Food is broken down in the stomach by powerful enzymes and acids and moves on to the small intestine.   Here it is distributed to the body as nutrients.   The large intestine is divided into three parts:

  • The first is where the plant cellulose is broken down and nutrients are extracted from it.
  • The second is the colon where the carbohydrates from the cellulose are absorbed.
  • The last is the rectum where waste materials are stored before being ejected through the anus.

Lusitano-035The reproductive system in the mare is made up of: two ovaries, two fallopian tubes which lead to the uterus, where the foal grows and develops and the vagina through which the semen is inserted by the stallion.   The stallion’s reproductive system consists of a penis and several different glands, one of which secrets semen which is inserted into the mare’s vagina through the penis.
.
.
.

Lusitano-044The respiratory system is much like that of any other animal: a pair of nostrils, pharynx, larynx, trachea, diaphragm, and lungs.   There are some peculiarities about it, though, for example, a horse cannot breathe through its mouth because it is separated by the palate from the air ducts.   The horse’s sense of smell is very fine and allows it to smell things from relatively long distances.   The horse’s respiratory system is unique in that it has what is called a guttural pouch which serves to equalize air pressure in the ears.
.
.
.

Lusitano-012The circulatory system is pumped by a heart with four chambers which weigh approximately eight pounds, and the blood vessel system which carried nutrients to the body and removes waste, like ours, does.   There is one big difference between us, though, under the horse’s hooves, there is a v-shaped formation which is called the frog.   The frog is part of the horse’s circulatory system. When the horse puts weight on it, blood is pushed through the legs and into the body and when the horse lifts each hoof blood returns to the leg full of nutrients and oxygen.
.
.
.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *